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Federal programs focus on putting resources where they’re needed most.

One of the most important factors for the success of public programs to combat the opioid crisis is putting resources on the ground when and where they are needed.See generally Beletsky, “21st Century Cures,” 2018.

That’s the goal of the Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Opioid- State Targeted Response (Opioid-STR) grant program.U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), “State Grant Programs: State Targeted Response to the Opioids Crisis Grants (Opioid-STR),”

Opioid-STR, which expanded in 2018, provides funding to states to help them assess needs, identify gaps, and “implement and expand access to . . . treatment for opioid use disorders[,] particularly the use of medication-assisted treatment and recovery support services.”U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), “State Grant Programs: State Targeted Response to the Opioids Crisis Grants (Opioid-STR),” Current grantees include all 50 states and the District of Columbia, plus five U.S. territories, and goals range from development of a data collection infrastructure to targeted deployment of trained personnel to rural and underserved areas.Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, “TI-17-014: State Targeted Response to the Opioid Crisis Grants (Opioid-STR) Individual Grant Awards,”

Also on the federal level, the National Institutes of Health continued to study public health approaches, launching the Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) Initiative in April, while the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention focused on analyzing risk and mobilizing resources for locations with the greatest need.For the National Institutes of Health (NIH) approach, see NIH, “About the NIH HEAL Initiativesm.” See also CDC, “Understanding the Epidemic.”