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Incarcerated people in federal prison speak out.

A first-ever survey[EWC1] of 2,000 people held in federal prisons, published by Families Against Mandatory Minimums in June 2017, found that many are not getting access to the programs and education that have been proven to reduce recidivism.Kevin Ring and Molly Gill, Using Time to Reduce Crime: Federal Prisoner Survey Results Show Ways to Reduce Recidivism (Washington, DC: Families Against Mandatory Minimums, 2017).

Only 3 percent of respondents had computer access.Kevin Ring and Molly Gill, Using Time to Reduce Crime: Federal Prisoner Survey Results Show Ways to Reduce Recidivism (Washington, DC: Families Against Mandatory Minimums, 2017). Sixty-nine percent of those surveyed said they had not received mental health or behavioral counseling, and more than half who were asked about the effectiveness of such programs said they were not helpful or of limited help.Kevin Ring and Molly Gill, Using Time to Reduce Crime: Federal Prisoner Survey Results Show Ways to Reduce Recidivism (Washington, DC: Families Against Mandatory Minimums, 2017). Ninety-seven percent said they would participate in recidivism-reducing programs in exchange for sentence reductions if such programs were available, and 89 percent would participate in such programs for other incentives.Kevin Ring and Molly Gill, Using Time to Reduce Crime: Federal Prisoner Survey Results Show Ways to Reduce Recidivism (Washington, DC: Families Against Mandatory Minimums, 2017).