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Youth of color continue to disproportionately bear the burdens of incarceration.

Despite significant reductions in juvenile confinement, youth of color continue to disproportionately bear the burdens of incarceration.The Sentencing Project, Black Disparities in Youth Incarceration (Washington, DC: The Sentencing Project, 2017).

According to a September 2017 analysis by the Sentencing Project, black youth were more than five times as likely to be detained or committed as white youth.The Sentencing Project, Black Disparities in Youth Incarceration (Washington, DC: The Sentencing Project, 2017). In many instances, these placements result from technical violations of probation that disproportionately result in incarceration for youth of color.W. Haywood Burns Institute, Stemming the Rising Tide: Racial & Ethnic Disparities in Youth Incarceration & Strategies for Change (Oakland, CA: W. Haywood Burns Institute, 2016), 10.  A 2016 report by the W. Haywood Burns Institute found that for every 100,000 white youth in the population, 9.4 were placed out of home for technical violations, compared to 33.2 black youth, 20.1 Latino youth, and 34.3 Native American youth.W. Haywood Burns Institute, Stemming the Rising Tide: Racial & Ethnic Disparities in Youth Incarceration & Strategies for Change (Oakland, CA: W. Haywood Burns Institute, 2016), 10.

In June 2017, a study released by the Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality found that adults view black girls between the ages of 5-14 as more adult-like than their white peers, which the authors note could explain why black girls are disciplined more harshly in school and across the juvenile justice system.Rebecca Epstein, Jamilia J. Blake, and Thalia González, Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls’ Childhood (Washington, DC: Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality, 2017), 1.