Alternative Forms of Punishment and Supervision for Convicted Offenders

Overview

This 1982 article argues that the criminal justice system has no credible capacity to punish or incapacitate offenders except by imprisoning them, and that a substantial amount of jailing results not from judicial preference for imprisonment, but from the perception of judges and prosecutors that incarceration is the only way to insure that the offender will not continue to be a threat to society. The essay recommends a conservative approach to developing the relatively new alternative sentencing field.

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Photo by Lucy Nicholson (REUTERS)

People in Jail and Prison in Spring 2021

Vera Institute of Justice (Vera) researchers collected data on the number of people in local jails and state and federal prisons throughout 2020 and into spring 2021. Vera researchers estimated the incarcerated population using a sample of approximately 1,600 jail jurisdictions, 50 states, the Federal Bureau of Prisons, the U.S. Marshals Service (U ...

Publication
  • Jacob Kang-Brown, Chase Montagnet, Jasmine Heiss
June 07, 2021
Publication